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With state funding through the House Bill 115 of the 126th General Assembly, The Ohio State University (OSU) and Cleveland State University (CSU) each provided a Chinese Teacher Alternative Licensure Training Program starting in September 2006 and ending in August 2007. The year-long tuition-free program requires 36 credit hours of specially designed graduate coursework. Upon successful completion of the program, the state Praxis exam, and a background check, the trainees will be eligible for a "provisional Ohio teaching license" the same license granted through traditional teacher training. The program at the OSU College of Education and Human Ecology has 26 trainees taught by a team headed by Dr. Charles Hancock. The CSU program has 14 trainees. For more information about the OSU program, please go to the brochure by OSU and Education Service Center of the Franklin County.

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With funding from the Ohio Board of Regents, the Regents' Chinese Academy enrolled 50 junior and senior high school students for intensive study of Chinese language from June 20 through August 17, 2007, at the Ohio State, Cleveland State and Miami Universities. The first stage, from June 20 to July 11, was for face-to-face learning, with master teacher Eric Shepherd delivering some lectures from OSU. The second stage, which ended on August 17, was mainly for individualized learning through internet connection. The program is free and there is a stipend for learners as well as for heritage students as peer mentors. For further information, visit the program website at http://chineseacademy.osu.edu or contact the university near you.

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At the invitation and with support from Hanban (Office of Chinese Language Council International), 51 Ohio educators from about forty schools and districts joined over 700 from other states to visit China from June 23 through July 1, 2007. They were treated as guests of honor by Minister Zhou Ji and Ms. Xu Lin of the Chinese Ministry of Education at the Great Hall of the People. They experienced the Chinese language and culture, and visited numerous K-12 schools in Beijing and 18 other provinces. Two school administrators from Ohio (Marcy Raymond of Metro School in Columbus and Katherine Bush of Summit Academy Schools) were featured in a report on China Daily (link), a national English newspaper in China. The Ohio educators were excited about the experience, which is helpful to their existing Chinese programs or to their planning to start Chinese programs. The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program is following up with all of them in order to enhance and expand the fast growing number of Chinese programs in Ohio. Hanban plans to sponsor annual Chinese Bridge Delegations in the next three years. For further information about the Chinese Bridge Delegation, please contact Kun Shi at 614-292-0460 or shi.7@osu.edu.

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The OSU Summer Programs East Asian Concentration (SPEAC) just completed another 7-week intensive training of Chinese language teachers from June 18 to August 2, 2007. More than twenty teachers of Chinese language signed up for the 15-credit graduate program and 15 of them successfully completed it.

SPEAC has been offering training programs for teachers for 12 years. Training program for teachers of Japanese began in 1995 and the program for teachers of Chinese began in 2000. This year marks another major year for SPEAC as it plans to collaborate with CLASS (Chinese Language Association of Secondary-Elementary Schools) to begin offering a program specifically designed for K-12 teachers of Chinese. SPEAC-CLASS K-12 Chinese teacher-training program promises to provide hands-on training for sound professional development. The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program will play a partner role in this new initiative. More information will become available on the SPEAC website soon.

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The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program organized two-day workshops for current and new teachers of Chinese language on June 19 and 28, 2007. Fourteen teachers from across Ohio attended the workshops. The workshops were intended for high school teachers because most of the Chinese programs in Ohio are at the high school level. They are focused on an introduction to the performance-based pedagogy, an overview of the curriculum for high school students, Chinese: Communicating in the Culture (CCC), and a demonstration and practice of CCC class. For more information about teacher training, please revisit Latest News and Events on our website, or contact Kun Shi (shi.7@osu.edu) or Zhiwei Bi (bi.2@osu.edu).

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The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program hosted a pre-interview meeting for school administrators to meet potential Chinese language teachers on April 16, 2007. Participants included 17 administrators from 10 schools/districts that want to hire Chinese language teachers, and 22 potential Chinese language teachers from the OSU Alternative Licensure Program. Contact information for the hiring schools was distributed to all potential Chinese language teachers at OSU. If any school plans to hire a qualified Chinese language teacher, please contact Kun Shi at 614-292-0460 or shi.7@osu.edu.

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The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) teamed up to sponsor a statewide conference on K-12 Chinese language and culture on December 14, 2006. The theme of the conference is Making the Global Connection: Linking Students and China in the 21st Century. More than 200 district superintendents, public and non-public school principals, curriculum directors, and teachers from across Ohio participated in this conference.

The full-day sessions included an overview of Chinese language programs and opportunities in Ohio, OSU's initiative to develop a statewide network of K-12 Mandarin Chinese programs, K-12 curriculum and content, AP Chinese, and technology and global education. The featured speakers were Dr. Robert Slater, Director of the National Security Education Program; Dr. Susan Tave Zelman, Superintendent of Public Instruction of ODE; Dr. Galal Walker, Director of the OSU Chinese Flagship Program and National East Asian Languages Resource Center; Dr. Debbie Robinson, World Language Consultant of ODE; James Chang and Ron Fortunato of the Global Knowledge Exchange; and Selena Cantor of the College Board.

The conference was well received and many districts and schools expressed interest in offering Chinese language program and are seeking support in curriculum development and teacher preparation. Partly as a result of the conference, more Ohio schools are planning to start Chinese language programs. Two years ago, only a few schools (mainly private schools) in Ohio had Chinese programs; however, by the 2007-08 school year, more than 40 schools (mainly public schools) will have Chinese programs.

The conference will become an annual event and the second annual conference is scheduled on December 12, 2007 (see Events for detail).

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NFLCThe OSU National East Asian Languages Resource Center (NEALRC) released the second edition of NFLC Guide to Basic Chinese Programs (December 2006). The National Foreign Language Center guide provides information that helps schools to create new Chinese language programs. It incorporates a set of informed and explicit assumptions about learning and teaching the language that underlie the creation of a syllabus and the pedagogical practices involved in implementing it. The target readership includes Chinese language teachers and program/curriculum administrators. To order, please contact Karen L. Moore (614-292-3838 or moore.626@osu.edu), Distribution Manager of NEALRC.

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After months of preparation, a partnership agreement was reached and signed on November 9, 2007 between the Columbus Metro High School and three organizations related to the Chinese heritage schools. Signing the agreement were representatives of the Metro High School (Marcy Raymond, Principal), Chinese School Association in the U.S. (Jason Ma), Ohio Contemporary Chinese School (Mingdeng Zhong), and Chinese Cultural Link (Dengke Xu). Both parties agree to share resources and collaborate in promoting the Chinese language and culture in K-12 schools in central Ohio.

The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program facilitated the partnership building between the two parties and will continue to provide support to them. It also plans to facilitate similar partnership between the Chinese heritage schools in other cities with local K-12 schools that offer Chinese. For more information, please contact Kun Shi at shi.7@osu.edu.

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OSU and ODE co-sponsored the second annual K-12 Chinese conference held on December 12, 2007, on OSU campus. More than 200 participants (mostly administrators and curriculum coordinators) from 110 schools and districts attended the one-day conference. Twelve teachers with license to teach Chinese were invited meet school/district administrators who would consider hiring. The conference theme continues to be “Making the Global Connection: Linking Students and China in the 21st Century,” but the focus this time is on how to develop and maintain healthy Chinese language programs. Because of the turnout and positive feedback, it is expected that there will be many more Ohio schools starting Chinese language programs in the next school year. The conference includes a general session, two break-out sessions, and a panel discussion. The topics and speakers are as follows:

General Session:
  • Welcome remarks and updates of the Ohio Language Roadmap report by Prof. Mari Noda (Chair of the OSU Department of East Asian Languages and Literature) and updates of the Ohio Foreign Language Advisory Council report by Dr. Marilyn Troyer (Senior Associate Superintendent of ODE)
  • K-12 Chinese in the United States by Shuhan Wang (Executive Director of the Chinese Education Initiative of Asia Society)
  • Teaching Chinese to High School Students by Eric Shepherd (Assistant Professor of Chinese of the Iowa State University)
  • K-12 Chinese Curriculum and Materials by Yu-Lan Lin (Executive Director of CLASS: Chinese Language Association of Secondary-Elementary Schools)
  • Learning Chinese and the Economy by Kimberly Kirkendall (CEO of China Source Link)
Breakout Session Track A for Schools Planning to Start a Program:
  • Starting Chinese Language Programs by Shuhan Wang (Asia Society) and Zhiwei Bi (OSU)
  • Seeking Qualified Teachers by Carol Tao Lin (College Board) and Ryan Wertz (ODE)
  • Advocacy and sustainability issues by Lucy Lee (CLASS) and Ryan Wertz (ODE)
Breakout Session Track B for Schools Already Operating a Program:
  • Curriculum Development by Yu-Lan Lin (CLASS), Debbie Robinson (ODE) and Huanzhen Zhao (OSU)
  • Teachers Development by Mari Noda (OSU) and Eric Shepherd (ISU)
  • Technology and Online Resources by Jun Liu (OSU) and Kun Shi (OSU)
  • Sustainability and Future Opportunities by Debbie Robinson (ODE) and Kun Shi (OSU)
Penal Discussion: Opportunities and Challenges:
  • Teacher panelists: Lisa Lin of Akron City Schools and Jeannine Subisak of Columbus Academy
  • Administrator panelists: Marcy Raymond of Metro High School and Ken Collura of Diocese of Columbus
  • Heritage school panelist: Max Xu of the Ohio Contemporary Chinese School
  • Institution panelists: Ryan Wertz of ODE and Kun Shi of OSU
Download PDF Files:

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The Ohio State University K-12 Chinese Flagship Program is awarded the StarTalk grant to coordinate two-week Chinese Immersion Summer Day Camps from June 12 through 25 in three metro areas of Ohio: Cleveland, Columbus, and Dayton. Seventy students with basic Chinese language skills will be recruited to have an immersion experience with teachers, activity facilitators and peer mentors. The Summer Day Camps are in collaboration with high schools of Beachwood and Shaker Heights in Cleveland area; Metro High School, Gahanna Lincoln High School and Diocese of Columbus in Columbus area; Beavercreek High School and Centerville High School in Dayton area; and Chinese heritage schools in the three cities. We are beginning the planning of the project and more information will be available here and distributed soon. To learn more about the Summer Day Camps, please visit star talkor contact Kun Shi at shi.7@osu.edu.

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The Chinese Immersion Summer Day Camps in three metro areas (Cleveland, Columbus and Dayton) have completed the total student enrollment of 70 students. Acceptance letters were sent to the students on May 11. The recruitment of 9 teachers, 6 facilitators and 23 peer mentors for three camps has been successfully completed, including the interview of all candidates. Offer letters were sent to them and local coordinators by May 11. The two-week curriculum is being developed and a training session for all teachers and facilitators is planned for May 24 at 2939 Kenny Road (in the building next to the OSU K-12 Chinese Program office), Columbus OH 43221. We are certain that at least 70 Ohio students will have a great immersion experience during June 16-27 to enhance their Chinese language skills.

The Summer Day Camps funded by StarTalk is a great opportunity to promote statewide innovative programs in Chinese language learning and cultural experience. It also serves as a model to combine the talents of the heritage schools (native-speaking teachers and peer mentors) with Ohio schools operating Chinese programs. Eventually, a multifaceted partnership will help Ohio students to reach high levels of Chinese proficiency. The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program is pleased to play a role to facilitate partnerships for Chinese programs at all levels. If you have questions about the Summer Day Camps, please contact Kun Shi.

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The National Chinese Language Conference was held in Washington, DC during April 17-19, 2008. Nearly 750 participants from 44 states and seven countries participated. They included policymakers, school board members, state or local education administrators, school principals and teachers, university faculty and parents.

The Ohio State University attracted special attention at the conference. First, the OSU President Gordon Gee delivered speeches at plenary sessions. Then, Eric Shepherd, professor of Chinese and graduate from OSU, staged professional performances of Chinese storytelling (Shandong Kuaishu) that brought loud applauses from the audience. Also presenting at the conference were Galal Walker and Kun Shi of the OSU Chinese Flagship Program. For more information, please click here.

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Along with the fast increasing Chinese language programs in K-12 schools across Ohio, there is a growing need for qualified/licensed Chinese language teachers. With state support, OSU is working with the Franklin County Education Service Center to recruit candidates for the third Chinese Alternative Teacher Licensure Training program, which is tuition free for qualified candidates (e.g., fluent speakers of Mandarin Chinese, or Ohio licensed teachers of other subjects with competent language skills; including international students with valid F-1 visa). The 12-month program includes 18 graduate credits (quarter system) in professional and pedagogical training, and another 18 credits in field experience and student teaching. The deadline for application is July 18, 2008.

To apply for Chinese Alternative Teacher Licensure Training program at OSU, please visit http://www.fcesc.org/license. For more information about the program (including the courses required), click here.

Similar Chinese licensure teacher training program is also going on at the University of Akron. For more information, visit http://www.uakron.edu/colleges/educ/fl-core/FL-CORE.php.

If you are teaching Chinese and want to apply for an alternative educator license, please click here. Good luck!

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Thanks to the support from StarTalk and all camp staff (camp coordinators, teachers and peer mentors), the OSU Chinese Immersion Summer Day Camps in three metro areas (Cleveland, Columbus and Dayton) completed with great success on June 27. The two-week camps were intensive, running from 9:00am through 5:00pm daily. Language learning was the focus and enough attention was also given to cultural immersion. Students pledged daily to speak Chinese and teachers were required to speak Chinese more than 85% of the time. 75 students signed up and 69 completed the immersion experience of Chinese language and culture. According to pre/post assessment of students’ performance, all students made significant progress in their linguistic and socio-cultural skills. Students and their parents expressed satisfaction with the camp experience. For a detailed report of the three Summer Day Camps in Chinese, please click here. For videos of the Summer Day Camp, please click here.

We particularly want to thank the following organizations for their support: Cleveland Contemporary Chinese School and Beachwood City School District for the Cleveland camp, Ohio Contemporary Chinese School and Metro High School for the Columbus camp, and the Greater Dayton Chinese School and Beavercreek High School for the Dayton camp. We look forward to working with them again next year, and plan to expand camp sites to Cincinnati and other cities. Please visit us here or the OSU StarTalk webpage next spring for more information. (Mari Noda and Kun Shi, co-directors of the OSU Summer Day Camps)

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The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship office has moved to the first floor (Suite 110) of the same building at 2941 Kenny Road in Columbus. The move is to meet the ADA requirement and meet the growing needs of our program. Other than suite number change, our previous contact information remains the same. For directions, click here.

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Utilizing web cams, microphones, plasma TV and various other high tech instrumentation, OSU instructors interact with students at Dover High School in real time to teach and to learn Chinese. This distance learning Chinese class started on August 25, 2008 and goes through June 2009. The class meets five times per week Monday through Friday, fifty minutes for each class. Their main teaching material is the Chinese: Communicating in the Culture.   

This course is designed for students who have no previous exposure to Chinese language. Students are trained to function successfully in Chinese culture using Mandarin as the primary language.  Currently there are ten students enrolled in the class. Two instructors from Ohio State University are currently co-teaching this class. Dan Rotnem is a native English speaker who is a graduate student in the OSU Chinese Flagship Program; Xizhen Qin is a native Chinese speaker and a doctoral student in Chinese pedagogy with the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at OSU.

So far, students are able to conduct some simple conversations in Mandarin Chinese, such as self introduction, greeting with appropriate terms of address, talking about people's physical appearance, personality and so on. For more information about the Dover High School distance learning, please contact Zhiwei Bi at bi.2@osu.edu.

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OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program and Ohio Department of Education successfully hosted the third annual K-12 Chinese conference on December 16, 2008. The conference theme is “Making the Global Connection: Linking Students and China in the 21st Century.” The General Session includes speakers of Galal Walker, Director of the Chinese Flagship Center, Deborah Delisle, the ODE Superintendent of Public Instruction, Deborah Scherer, Director of the Global Markets Division of Ohio Department of Development, and Karen Mencl, keynote and OSU professor. There were three tracks of workshops for schools planning to start Chinese programs and schools with established programs, and for in-service professional development for current teachers of Chinese. There was a session for sharing information and experience, and a job fair after lunch. The conference was co-sponsored by the Ohio Teachers of Chinese (OATC), Miami University Confucius Institute, and the OSU National East Asian Languages Resource Center. For a report in Chinese in the Erie Chinese Journal, please click here

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The American Councils for International Education received federal funding to send 90 high school students to China for immersion language and cultural experience for 6-8 weeks during the summers of 2009-10. Another 30 will be sent for full academic semester study, and 15 more for full academic year study during the 2009-10 school year. This is ideal for those committed students who want to continue learning Chinese when entering college. There is little cost for such great opportunity! However, the applicant must be U.S. citizen and between 15 and 18 years of age when the program starts, and have a GPA above 2.5. For more information and online application (deadline by February 2), please visit www.nsliforyouth.org.

In addition to other requirements, student essay and teacher recommendations are very important. If you have questions about the online application, please contact:

Svitlana Morris, Program Officer of NSLI –Youth; Email: smorris@americancouncils.org.
Loren Kupferschmid, Program Manager of NSLI-Youth; Email: lkupferschmid@americancouncils.org
American Councils for International Education
1776 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 700
Washington, D.C. 20036
Tel. 202-833-7522

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The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program started offering Chinese via video-conferencing to Dover High School students in August 2008.
On November 12, ten Dover students of Chinese and their teacher Marianne Beedle visited OSU and met their teachers Luo Laoshi (Dan Rotnem) and Qin Laoshi (Xizhen Qin) in person. They visited the facility in Hagerty Hall, practiced conversations with Luo Laoshi, observed an OSU beginning Chinese class, and then visited Metro High School and its Chinese class. Finally, they were treated with Chinese food and practiced Chinese at the lunch table. Zhiwei Bi and Patrick McAloon were present to interact with the students and help with the visit. The students were excited about the experience and motivated to learn Chinese. For more information about the Dover program, please click here. For a TV report about the program, please click here. For further information, please contact Zhiwei Bi at bi.2@osu.edu.

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During the annual Ohio Foreign Language Association (OFLA) annual conference in early April 2009 in Columbus, Chinese language teachers and staff made another contribution to their peers and colleagues of other languages. The Ohio Association of Teachers of Chinese (OATC) organized a swap shop on April 3 to share teaching strategies, and the presenters included Amanda Lin (Gahanna-Jefferson Schools), Wen Yi (Shaker Heights City Schools), Shirley Doty (Columbus Diocese Schools), Jeannine Subisak (Columbus Academy), and Nanping Wang (Beavercreek City Schools). Mike Kralovic and Nanping Wang presided over the session.

Also presenting at the conference were Jeanette Kam, Shirley Doty and Mengqi Wu of Columbus Diocese Schools (on distance learning for middle school students), and Kun Shi of the OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program (on challenges of teacher development). Kun was awarded the annual OFLA Educator Friend of Foreign Languages Award.

During the conference, the OSU Chinese Flagship Program and the National East Asian Languages Resource Center hosted a booth in reaching out to dozens of Chinese language teachers and many other participants. Dr. Galal Walker presented a Chinese calligraphy scroll to Dr. Susan Tave Zelman, former Superintendent of Public Instruction of ODE, appreciating her support to K-12 Chinese language education in Ohio. At the fund-raising event for Camp OFLA, Qun (Jen) Hu-Yan (Shaker Heights Schools) and Kun Shi each donated $100 in honor of the 22 guest teachers from Mainland China and one teacher from Taiwan now working in Ohio.

OFLA Educator Friend of Foreign Languages 2009 Award to Kun Shi

Presentation outline by Kun Shi

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In the past few years, many schools and districts in Ohio have contributed to the rapid growth of Chinese language programs. Among them, Shaker Heights City Schools is playing a leading role, thanks to the leadership of Superintendent Mark Freeman and Curriculum Director James Paces. Within three years, the district has offered Chinese language and culture to hundreds of high school and elementary school students. Currently four Chinese language teachers are working in the district, including three guest teachers from China (Luling Li, Baohua Liu, and Wen Yi) and one locally hired teacher (Qun (Jen) Hu-Yan). The plan is to hire another teacher next year to help elementary school students continue to learn Chinese. For more information about the Chinese programs at Shaker Heights Schools, please contact Dr. James Paces.

The district is partnering with the OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program to benefit from its support in teacher development and technology connection. It also works with the local heritage school and the Cleveland Museum of Art, which has a large collection about Chinese and Asian culture. The district has sent many exchange students to China, and one of them (Ariel Pruitt) is staying there for a semester. Some of its Chinese programs and activities in China are reported in the November 2008 issue of Phi Delta Kappan.

Shaker Heights administrators are proud of all their dedicated Chinese language teachers. Worthy of special mention is Ms. Wen Yi, who won the Creative Teaching Plan Award at the 9th International Conference on Chinese Language Teaching held in December 2008 in Beijing. One of her demo lessons is about teaching sports in Chinese and is available on YouTube.

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On April 23-24, the OSU Chinese Flagship made a major outreach effort to the K-12 schools in eastern Pennsylvania clustered around Burks County. Burks County Intermediate Unit (BCIU) organized the first conference on Chinese language and culture (under the name of Asian Studies Collaborative), and invited Galal Walker and Kun Shi as keynote speakers. Other speakers include Michelle Heryford (Director of Confucius Institute of the University of Pittsburg) and Pamela Kolega (World Language Education Advisor of Pennsylvania Department of Education). More than 60 school administrators and teachers of Chinese attended the conference, and some of them are planning to start Chinese language programs in the coming school year.

BCIU sponsors annual conference on Asian languages and cultures. The OSU Chinese Flagship outreach is the result of initial contact by Susan Calvin, Project Administrator of the BCIU Educational Technology Services, to seek technical assistance in the BCIU planning for more Chinese language programs. Susan and William Miller (BCIU Division Administrator for IT) came to the OSU-ODE third annual conference on K-12 Chinese in December 2009, and invited Galal Walker to serve on the BCIU Advisory Board. For more information about the event, please click here.

Key-note presentation outline by Galal Walker and Kun Shi

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NSLI (National Security Language Initiative) for Youth is part of a multi-agency U.S. government initiative launched in January 2006 to improve American ability to engage with people from around the world who speak Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Hindi, Korean, Persian (Farsi), Russian and Turkish. The Department of State, in cooperation with American Councils, AFS-USA, iEARN-USA, and Concordia Language Villages, awards full merit-based scholarships to high school students for participation in summer, semester, and academic-year language programs in countries where the seven NSLI for Youth languages are spoken. Programs immerse participants in the cultural life of the host country giving them invaluable formal and informal language practice and sparking a lifetime interest in foreign languages and cultures. NSLI for Youth Scholarships cover all program costs including international travel and costs in China. For more information about eligibility and apply online, please visit: http://www.nsliforyouth.org/nslicms-0.2/

In the 2009-2010 school year, two of Ohio’s students received the NSLI scholarship to study in China for a full academic year at a Chinese high school: Dana Buzzelli from the Brecksville-Broadview Heights High School (now in Nanjing), and Diane He from Miamisburg High School (now in Harbin). Both of them have participated in the summer day camps organized by the OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program. For a report about the NSLI opportunity for Ohio students, click here. For more information about our summer programs, please contact Kun Shi at shi.7@osu.edu.

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The U.S. Department of Education today announced the award of more than $12.4 million in Foreign Language Assistance Program (FLAP) grants to local and state school systems in 24 states and the District of Columbia, aimed at promoting the instruction of foreign languages critical to national security. Three Ohio local education agencies are awarded the FLAP grants.

More than 55% of all FLAP funds are awarded to Chinese programs. For more information, click here. The FLAP awards to Ohio school Chinese programs are as follows:

  • Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School District - $177,746
  • East Central Ohio Educational Service Center (formerly Tuscarawas Carroll Harrison Education Service Center) - $291,564
  • Summit County Educational Service Center - $300,000

The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program is working closely with the East Central Ohio Educational Service Center to implement its Chinese language program in several districts within its jurisdiction, and with another new FLAP grant program of the Berks County Intermediate Unit in Pennsylvania. We have collaborated with one of the schools in the area (Dover High School) in developing its online Chinese program for two school years. We also look forward to working with the other two FLAP programs in Ohio.

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Confucius Classroom is a new initiative K-12 Chinese sponsored by Hanban through partnerships with Confucius Institutes and Asia Society. It is a good addition to enhance and sustain existing Chinese language programs. Hanban provides start-up funds, study materials and guest teacher(s) for each Confucius Classroom operated by K-12 partner schools in the U.S. and in China. For more information, please click here. General terms of the agreement are available at here. To find out the Asia Society’s Confucius Classroom Initiative, please click here.

So far, Confucius Classrooms in two Ohio school districts have been approved. They are Shaker Heights City Schools and Marion Local Schools. The OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program is interested in helping you to form any partnership to sustain your Chinese language program.

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Over the last few years, the Teachers of Critical Languages Program (TCLP) has brought dozens of teachers from China and sent teachers of non-native speakers to China for training. Currently, TCLP teachers are working in two Ohio school districts: Benjamin Logan and Winton Woods.

Applications for TCLP Teachers are due by February 12, 2010

TCLP, a program of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, seeks to develop Chinese and Arabic programs in K-12 schools throughout the United States, bringing EFL teachers from China and Egypt and placing them in US schools for an academic year where they teach Mandarin or Arabic language and culture. TCLP provides teachers' salaries, health care, round trip airfare, training, professional development funds, and on-going program support. Additionally, host schools receive access to $5,000 grant opportunities to support language learning projects, and their designated mentors receive monthly honoraria as well. Applications to host an exchange teacher in the 2010-11 school year can be downloaded or completed online at www.tclprogram.org.

Applications for Intensive Summer Language Institutes (ISLI) are due by March 1, 2010

ISLI, supported by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is a program that strengthens foreign language instruction in critical languages at U.S. schools by providing U.S. teachers of Arabic, Chinese, and Russian with the opportunity to study these languages at the intermediate and advanced level in Egypt, China, and Russia, respectively, for six weeks during the summer. The program is open to current U.S. K-12 teachers as well as community college instructors of Arabic, Chinese, and Russian who are non-native speakers of the target language. It is also open to students enrolled in education programs intending to teach these languages. Applications to study for six weeks in the summer of 2010 are due March 1, 2010, and can be found at www.americancouncils.org/isli.

For further information, contact the program officer at the American Councils for International Education: Eliza Doton, at (202) 833-7522 (phone) or (202) 833-7523 (fax).

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On February 27, the OSU K-12 Chinese Flagship Program hosted a reunion for students who participated in the 2009 study trip to China. A report of the trip was published by the Erie Chinese Journal.

The students and their families enjoyed the reunion and a presentation that documented their trip in China last July. Then Dr. Walker and Kun Shi presented certificates to each student. The students and their family members were excited about the conversations, snacks, and more opportunities to learn Chinese.

To download the reunion photos, click here

To download the presentation, click here

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According to their teacher Hua Zhang, six of MVS students have been recognized by Chinese Language Association of Secondary-Elementary Schools (CLASS) for their entries in the 6th National CLASS Essay Contest, a competitive Chinese writing contest for students in grades 5-12. Juniors Emily Badgley and Jonathan Nguyen won Silver Awards for second place; freshmen Alex Lachey and Robbie Weinstein achieved Honorable Mention; and 8th graders Ishan Paranjpe and Manish Paranjpe received Participation Award. While Rachel Gorsky and Kimberly Lee participated in the National Speech Contest in the previous year, this is the first time MVS students have entered the National Chinese Essay Contest. With guidance from Ms. Zhang, Alex Lachey has been recently selected to participate in the final Chinese Bridge Competition for high school students. For more information, contact Ms. Hua Zhang.

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